Department of Archaeology and Ancient History

Jonas Monié Nordin

Jonas.nordin@arkeologi.uu.se

I am employed as a researcher in archeology at the University of Uppsala and the Swedish History Museum. Currently I am involved in, and directing two research projects, Collecting Sápmi, focused on colonial collecting of Sami material culture during the early modern period, and A Colonial Arena focusing on the exploitation of natural resources in Sápmi during the Seventeenth century. Both projects are funded by the Swedish Research Council and run in partnership with Carl-Gösta Ojala 2014–2017. Collecting Sápmi is a multidisciplinary research program in the intersection of archeology, history and critical culture studies, with participants from Finland, Norway and Sweden.

I have previously been focusing on landscape archeology with a special focus on the Middle Ages. In 2005 I defended my doctoral dissertation When Power Became Visible (Sw. När makten blev synlig) at Stockholm University. Between 2008 and 2014 I worked as Senior curator dealing with the period after about 1500 at the Swedish History Museum where I also had a post-doc position focusing on early modern globalization. The five-year research project was part of the Royal Academy of Letters and Antiquities, and the Riksbankens jubileumsfond, ABM research effort. Since 2013 I am Associate Professor of Historical Archaeology at Lund University.

My research revolves around three themes: globalization, colonization and modernization. I have worked with case studies from North America (New Sweden Colony), Swedish Africa Company’s establishment on the Gold Coast (present Ghana), the construction of the Danish colony of Tranquebar in southern India and Swedish colonization of Sápmi. I have also studied how colonialism and globalization affected consumption and aesthetics in central Sweden´during the early modern period.

Together with Magdalena Naum, University of Lund, I run the research network GlobArch focusing on Scandinavian colonial archeology. The project is funded by the Riksbankens jubileumsfond.