JAAH 2014 No. 12 Grabowski

Radoslaw Grabowski,

Identification and delineation of settlement space functions in the south Scandinavian Iron Age: theoretical perspectives and practical approaches

Fulltext (DIVA-länk)

Redaktionskommitténs loggbok med granskarnas kommentarer

Illustrationer 

Fig. 1 Satellite image of southern Scandinavia showing the locations of case studies pre-
sented in the article. Source: Google Earth.

Fig. 2 Time-line displaying the local Danish and south Swedish chronological nomenclature.

Fig. 3 Schematic illustration showing the formation of a sampled posthole (d). Once the
post (a) is removed, the surrounding floor/yard layers erode into the posthole, forming a sec-
ondary fill, also commonly termed as “the post trace” (b). If the posthole is sufficiently deep, it
may survive subsequent disturbances such as bioturbation and ploughing, and be identified and
sampled by archaeologists.

Fig. 4 Plan of longhouses A11298 and A11299 with surroundings, showing the locations
of samples taken along a horizontal grid (small crosses), samples taken from feature fills (tur-
quoise triangles), and recorded artefact finds, in this case consisting solely of pottery (P).

Fig. 5a Plan of longhouses A11298 and A11299 with surroundings, displaying an overlaid
interpolation of data from the horizontal sampling as well as the results of feature-fill analysis
with categorized symbols: a) inorganic phosphates, b) organic phosphates, c) phosphate quota,
and d) soil organic matter.

Fig. 5b Plan of longhouses A11298 and A11299 with surroundings, displaying an overlaid
interpolation of data from the horizontal sampling as well as the results of feature-fill analysis
with categorized symbols: a) inorganic phosphates, b) organic phosphates, c) phosphate quota,
and d) soil organic matter.

Fig. 5c Plan of longhouses A11298 and A11299 with surroundings, displaying an overlaid
interpolation of data from the horizontal sampling as well as the results of feature-fill analysis
with categorized symbols: a) inorganic phosphates, b) organic phosphates, c) phosphate quota,
and d) soil organic matter.

Fig. 5d Plan of longhouses A11298 and A11299 with surroundings, displaying an overlaid
interpolation of data from the horizontal sampling as well as the results of feature-fill analysis
with categorized symbols: a) inorganic phosphates, b) organic phosphates, c) phosphate quota,
and d) soil organic matter.

Fig. 6 “Bubble” plot showing three geochemical parameters recorded for samples from
A11298, A11299, A11303, A11304 and A11310 at Gedved Vest, Locality 1. The circle size rep-
resents CitPOI (i.e. the total amount of phosphate accessible by citric acid extraction) in each
sample, samples from each house being represented by different colours. The Y-axis shows
the CitPQuota, i.e. the relationship between inorganic and organic phosphates, higher quota
levels representing a higher proportion of organic phosphate. The X-axis shows the amount
of organic matter (SOM) in percentage of the entire sample (after drying)

Fig. 7 Box-plots showing the measured phosphate and SOM-variation in samples from the
horizontal grid-survey and sampling of feature fills respectively.

Fig. 8 Reconstruction of a farmstead at Gedved Vest around the shift from the Late pre-
Roman to the Roman Iron Age, inspired by an analysis of House A11298 and its surroundings.
The longhouse is adjoined by outhouses, one of which acts as a byre. Manure is handled in the
front yard, while waste disposal takes place behind the main longhouse. Illustration by Sofia
Lindholm.

Fig. 9 Plan of House II at Raä 593, Svarteborg sn, overlaying the distribution of cereals,
weeds-ruderals and oliferous plants (a). Beneath the plan are b) remaining plant categories, c)
MSQuota, d) inorganic and organic phosphates, e) phosphate quota and, e) soil organic matter.
The overlain lines in graphs c-f show the median for each population (middle dot) and 1 stan-
dard deviation (upper and lower dot).

Fig. 10 Plan of Raä 106, Snöstorp sn, Fylling

Fig. 11 Plan of House 1 at Raä 106, Snöstorp sn, Fyllinge, overlaying the distribution of
cereals, weeds-ruderals and oliferous plants (a). Beneath the plan are b) remaining plant cat-
egories, c) MSQuota, d) inorganic and organic phosphates, e) phosphate quota, and e) soil
organic matter. The overlaid lines in graphs c-f show the median for each population (middle
dot) and 1 standard deviation (upper and lower dot

Fig. 12 Plan of House 3 at Raä 106, Snöstorp sn, Fyllinge, overlaying the distribution of
cereals, weeds-ruderals and oliferous plants (a). Beneath the plan are b) remaining plant cat-
egories, c) MSQuota, d) inorganic and organic phosphates, e) phosphate quota, and e) soil
organic matter. The overlaid lines in graphs c-f show the median for each population (middle
dot) and 1 standard deviation (upper and lower dot

Fig. 13 Plan of House 1 at Raä 59, Elestorp sn, Fyllinge, overlaying the distribution of cere-
als, weeds-ruderals and oliferous plants (a). Beneath the plan are b) the remaining plant catego-
ries, c) MSQuota, d) inorganic and organic phosphates, e) phosphate quota, and e) soil organic
matter. The overlaid lines in graphs c-f show the median for each population (middle dot) and
1 standard deviation (upper and lower dot).

Fig. 14 Plan of Raä 195, Skrea sn, showing the construction phases represented by House
5/6 and outhouses 7, 8 and 9 (thin red lines) and House 1 and outhouse 10 (thicker black
lines).

Fig. 15a Archaeobotanical and geochemical results from Raä 195, Skrea sn: a) composition
of carbonised botanical assemblages, and b) “bubble” plot showing three geochemical parame-
ters recorded for samples from houses 5/6 and 1 as well as outhouses 7, 8, 9 and 10. The circle
size represents CitPOI (i.e. the total amount of phosphate accessible by citric acid extraction)
in each sample, samples from each house being represented by different colours. The Y-axis
shows the CitPQuota, i.e. the relationship between inorganic and organic phosphates, higher
quota levels representing a higher proportion of organic phosphate. The X-axis shows the
amount of organic matter (SOM) in percentage of the entire sample (after drying).

Fig. 15b Archaeobotanical and geochemical results from Raä 195, Skrea sn: a) composition
of carbonised botanical assemblages, and b) “bubble” plot showing three geochemical parame-
ters recorded for samples from houses 5/6 and 1 as well as outhouses 7, 8, 9 and 10. The circle
size represents CitPOI (i.e. the total amount of phosphate accessible by citric acid extraction)
in each sample, samples from each house being represented by different colours. The Y-axis
shows the CitPQuota, i.e. the relationship between inorganic and organic phosphates, higher
quota levels representing a higher proportion of organic phosphate. The X-axis shows the
amount of organic matter (SOM) in percentage of the entire sample (after drying).

Table 1 List of parameters that may convey functional evidence on south Scandinavian settle-
ment sites marking the likelihood of their usefulness for identifying and delineating various
functional spaces. The parameters are grouped into three main categories: construction, use
and abandonment, representing different life stages of prehistoric houses. Parameters included
in the botanical, geochemical and geophysical multiproxy analysis developed at MAL in Umeå
are marked in bold italics

Table 2   14C-data for Houses A11298 and A11299

Table 3 Summary of carbonised plant macrofossils recovered from the houses in the case
study section of Locality 1 at Gedved Ves

Table 4 An overview of which function-indicating parameters were used on each of the here
presented cases in order to attain an interpretation about past use of spaces. The asterisk de-
notes parameters that were observed, but did not contribute toward the final interpretation. To
the far right is also an overview of indications of whether the house was burnt or not.

Senast uppdaterad: 2022-02-15